FACTS

Give Life Save Life is a foundation committed to bringing awareness and the importance of registering for organ donation, bone marrow and donating blood for our communities.

 

 

Did You Know?

 

  • 60% of the population is medically eligible to give blood, yet only 5% of the national population donates blood

  • If all blood donors gave 2 to 4 times a year, it would help prevent blood shortages

  • 4.5 million Americans would die each year without life saving blood transfusions

  • Every three seconds someone needs blood

  • About three gallons of blood supports the entire nation’s blood needs for one minute

 

 

Facts You Need to Know

 

  • More than 113,000 people in the United States are currently on the waiting list for a lifesaving organ transplant

  • Another name is added to the national transplant waiting list every 12 minutes

  • On average, 18 people die every day from the lack of available organs for transplant

  • 7% of people on the waiting list—more than 6,500 each year—die before they are able to receive a transplant

  • One deceased donor can save up to eight lives through organ donation and can save and enhance more than 100 lives through the lifesaving and healing gift of tissue donation

  • Organ recipients are selected based primarily on medical need, location and compatibility

  • To date, 461,776 transplants have occurred in the U.S. since 1988

  • Organs that can be donated after death are the heart, liver, kidneys, lungs, pancreas and small intestines. Tissues include corneas, skin, veins, heart valves, tendons, ligaments and bones

  • The cornea is the most commonly transplanted tissue. More than 40,000 corneal transplants take place each year in the United States

  • A healthy person can become a ‘living donor’ by donating a kidney, or a part of the liver, lung, intestine, blood or bone marrow

  • More than 6,000 living donations occur each year. One in four donors is not biologically related to the recipient

 

 

Help Us Save Lives!

African Americans are the least likely group of people to become organ donors, although almost 45% of African Americans will need some sort of organ transplant in their lifetime.

 

 

Give the Gift Of Life… Donate Blood

  • There are four main blood types: A, B, AB and O

  • Type O+ blood is the most common, most frequently used blood type

  • Type O- is the universal donor since most people can accept this type of blood regardless of their blood type

  • Type AB+ is the universal recipient, since people with this blood type can normally accept all blood types

© 2016 GLSL